Guess What!

Over the last two weeks I have been quietly working up a hat pattern. I made a similar hat a few years ago, but this time I’m making it better and writing it out. I decided to try my luck by submitting the pattern to a magazine. Designing for free is nice, but I like to get paid. And even more important is the exposure a magazine could give me. So yesterday I worked like a fiend to get all the required information together, and I submitted my pattern just before 10PM.

This morning I got an email that the magazine wanted to use my pattern. I’m so excited I could scream! I’m going to be published in Knotions Magazine.

The Call Box Hat will be published at the end of September in Knotions Magazine.

I couldn’t be more chuffed!

 

Tour de Fleece – Update

Last October I went to SAFF. I plan to go again this year, but I figure I should at least try to use up the spinning fiber I bought there last year.

fiber

So far I’m at spinning project 2/3 (this was the first project using the yellow fiber): I’m spinning the grey carbonized bamboo at the bottom of the picture. I’m used to spinning wool (or even silk), so this bamboo feels decidedly not natural.

spinning

This is extruded bamboo, which is similar to Rayon (but rayon is made with wood). The fiber has a bit of a powdery feel to it, which I assume is from the carbonization process. It is super soft, though, and it will be great for the neck part of my True Brit cowl.

I don’t know if I will finish the red silk fiber before this year’s SAFF though. The yellow silk was a 4 month slog and I just don’t know if I have it in me to do it again. Is there a way to spin silk quickly?

Whimsy

I try to stick to the knitting queue that I have established. I (mostly) keep my WIPs to a minimum. I start a project, and then I work on it. Sometimes, though, I just need to break out of the box and start a project on a whim.

I’ve had this book for a while, and this cowl has been on my list to make for a few years. The yarn is some of my oldest stash (and I plan to use some handspun as well). Over all, I think this is a pretty responsible whim.

What do you do when “the plan” is no longer working for you?

Working

Well, friends, I am working on my next design. I don’t think work ever stops when you are a designer, but it is such exciting work. And (in theory, at least) you get to knit for your job. How cool is that? I’m still new to designing, still getting my feet wet, still learning what works well and what doesn’t. I’m also testing out the waters of submitting ideas and patterns to magazines (super exciting, super scary!). Because of this I can’t post a lot of pictures right now, but here is a sneak peek of what you’ll be seeing (hopefully) soon. I can’t wait!

dusk

If you’re interested, you can find my published designs here.

 

Sunset Boulevard

Fresh off my spinning wheel!

1

This is an incredible 545 yds of fingering weight singles. I wrote more in detail about the construction here. I couldn’t be more pleased with how this yarn came out, and I’m very pleasantly surprised about the amount of yardage!

Next up is a batch of Carbonized Bamboo top that I bought last year at SAFF. And yes, it feels as odd as it sounds.

 

Tour de Fleece

The other day I mentioned that I was practicing spinning fat singles in preparation for a special project. I’ve been working on that project, and I am delighted with my progress!

It all started a few months ago when I ordered some fiber for my sisters to learn how to spin. I couldn’t just order something for them and nothing for me, so I got this. Since the Tour de France just started and I am participating in the similar (but less athletic) Tour de Fleece (this article is from last year), it seemed like the perfect time to use it up (also before it got sucked into deep stash). This is the first time I have really taken the time to plan a skein. First I laid out my fiber. The colours are even more vibrant in real life: yellow, orange, red, and purple (I promise it’s not really black. My apartment just has bad lighting.)

top

I separated the colours, fluffed up the ends, and pulled off a handful of each colour.

bits

You see, I had this brilliant idea to tie all the colours together. Each handful was further separated into 3 pieces and paired with the other 3 colours (So the yellow section had bits of orange, red, and purple; the orange section had yellow, red, and purple; the red section had yellow, orange, and purple; and the purple section had yellow, orange, and red bits). I further divided these sections into several pieces and incorporated them into my yarn at random intervals. It’s hard to see while still on the bobbin, but they are there, and I can’t wait to see how the yarn turns out!

Are you spinning in the Tour de Fleece? What are you working on?

Also, today is your last chance to get 20% off my newest pattern, the Raindrops and Wildflowers Cowl with the coupon code BEATRIX. I bet this would be glorious in handspun!