The 4th Try Is the Charm

It is 7:30 on Saturday night: I am dreaming of knitting and starting a new project (For some reason none of the 5 million projects I have going is just right to work on right now. I’m studiously ignoring the fact that I have 5 million projects). I’m browsing Ravelry looking for something in brioche and I come across this cowl that I’ve had queued for months. Perfection. I buy the pattern.

8:30 PM on Saturday: I’ve rummaged through my stash and found the perfect yarn – Hedgehog Fibers Sock in Nutmeg (that I bought on my honeymoon) and KnitPicks Stroll in Midnight Heather. Yummy! I cast on, figure out how to do brioche again, and work a few rows. Exhausted, I go to bed.

yarn

12:30 PM on Sunday: *I pick up my knitting, work a few rows, and make a mistake I can’t fix. I rip it all out and start again. Repeat from * once more. Walk away frustrated. Clean house instead.

6 PM on Sunday: I notice my yarn is starting to show signs of wear. I stop to think before casting on for the 4th time. I decide to use a larger needle to cast on so the top will be nice and stretchy. I ask my husband to kiss my yarn for good luck before I start – he complies with no further questions, bless him. Using a US 6 circular needle I cast on the required number of stitches. I join to work in the round. I switch a smaller needle and work the foundation rounds. I join my second colour and start brioche-ing away. A few rows later I make a mistake, but it’s only a small mistake and easily fixable. I’m sailing away to Brioche land.

brioche!

Angerthas

angerthas

J.R.R. Tolkien was a genius. He worked on the Oxford English Dictionary, he wrote books for which he created a complete history/mythology, and he also created multiple languages for his books. The Angerthas is the alphabet he made for the Dwarves. Each rune is formed with all straight lines: perfect for carving in stone and for knitting.

Angerthas mitts

Last week I finished knitting the Angerthas Mitts, and now I’m looking for pattern testers, especially knitters with large or small hands. If you are interested in test knitting please read through the requirements here and reply to the conversation thread. I’m getting everything ready for when the pattern is released (for free) on December 31 in Knotions Magazine.

P.S. If you haven’t been over to Knotions yet, check out my most recent design, the Call Box Hat!

The Time Has Come!

The Call Box Hat is live! Get your copy of the pattern from Knotions Magazine, find your worsted weight yarn, and get knitting! Winter is coming.

The Call Box Hat is available in only one size (21”/ 53cm unstretched), but it is very stretchy and should fit most adult and teen heads. It is easy to knit – using only knit, purl, and directional decreases. The contrasting brim is a great way to use some worsted weight leftovers, but you will need a little more than a full skein of yarn for the main color.

Wait For It…

folded hat

In 2011 one of my best friends introduced me to Doctor Who. We were on a choir tour, so we had a lot of time to kill on the bus from one location to the next. She had downloaded a bunch of episodes to her computer, and we binge watched our way from state to state. Doctor Who quickly became one of my favourite things. I didn’t know how to knit then, but after I learned I wanted a TARDIS hat. The only problem was that I didn’t really like any of the patterns I saw online. What’s a knitter to do? Make her own pattern, that’s what!

I knit the original Call Box Hat around Christmas of 2014. It fit pretty well, but it was too loose of a gauge for me and the wind would blow through it. I still loved it, despite it’s shortcomings, and I was very sad this past winter to find that I had somehow lost it. I decided to replace it with a better version of itself. I swatched and reworked my charts to make a better, more windproof hat. You might remember a few months ago when I finished this beauty.

Well, the time has finally come. It is being published in Knotions Magazine this Saturday, September 30! You can see the preview here. I’m so excited!

Fingerless Gloves Shouldn’t Take This Long

I’ve been working on another design, this time for fingerless gloves. They are knit with fingering weight yarn and US 3 (3.25 mm) needles. I started the first glove September 8, according to Ravelry.

glove

Of course the first glove was not quite right. So I had to knit a second first glove. I finished it last night and I think it is just about perfect. So now I am racing to the finish line, trying to knit the first second glove before the end of the month. Why the rush, you ask? The gloves have already been accepted by Knotions Magazine for their December issue. Squeee!

Glove Love

Several weeks ago my husband came into the yarn store with me and bought some Viking of Norway yarn. With his own money. Can we just stop and savor that for a moment ?

viking Raggen

He told me he wanted half-finger gloves. I can do that (I used this pattern). I knit the whole first glove in one day (it was my day off), and the second glove only took me 2 more days to make. I call that a fast project.

finished gloves

He calls them hobo gloves, but I keep reminding him that most hobos don’t wear handknits.

rawr

I guess he’s a Viking Hobo now.