My First Renaissance Festival!

I have wanted to go to a Renaissance festival since I first heard about them as a teenager. Alas, growing up in Arizona I didn’t come across many. However, now that I’ve moved to the SouthEast, I have more options (also being an adult with a car and spending money helps). A few weeks ago my Sister-in-Law invited me to go to the Renaissance Festival with her. I had already been playing with the idea of making a Medieval dress for Halloween, so a few days after we finalized our plans I finally caved in and bought fabric.

The fabric I used was a deep red Polyester knit velvet – not what they used in the time, but comfortable and it looked good. I used the Alabama Chanin Long-sleeved T-shirt as a base pattern for the bodice and angled my skirt pieces out to the edge of my fabric. I used the remaining triangular pieces as gores to widen my skirt. Pinning took ages, and then I used a simple running stitch to sew all my seams. In a perfect world I would have also felled the seams, but I was sewing the dress completely by hand and running out of time. Miraculously I found a perfectly matching trim for the neck and sleeves. Even though the trim is woven and the dress is knit, the edges lay pretty well. The hem took me ages. I folded it under about 4 inches and just basted it down to the inside. Maybe someday I’ll go back and finish the hem properly, but the important thing is that the dress was done on time and I wasn’t tripping over it all day (although I did end up ticking the train into my belt so other people wouldn’t be tripping on me all day). The final piece was braiding a wire circlet and borrowing a leather belt to complete the look. My SiL and I had a fabulous time and I felt so pretty (and comfortable!) in my costume!

 

Small Starts

This has been a week of small starts and no finishes. Work on the blanket continues. I swatched for socks and a tee, but have to wash the swatches before I can do more. Here is the red blouse I have been working on – languishing in want of a zipper.

shirt

What do you think? I’m pretty happy with how she is shaping up.

I recently bought the Wiksten Tank pattern and this fabric to make it in. Yummy!

fabric

My Sister in Law recently had a birthday. She loves books even more than I do (and I love books a lot), so I made her this necklace. I hope she loves it. I’ve been saving this book charm for a long time.

Restless

I have a bad case of startitis. But I’m trying to be good and not cast on ALL the things. Just some of them. My husband and I watched a documentary on minilamism recently, and it made me think about all the things I have that I don’t use. So I pulled this skirt out of my closet to rework as a tunic. I love the skirt, but I rarely wear it, and a tunic is much more realistic for my lifestyle. (Pattern adapted from Alabama Studio Sewing + Design)

skirt

I needed some thread and binding to start/finish this project, so I went to my local fabric and craft store and fell down the rabbit hole. I have plans to make a project bag from these.

fabric

Making doesn’t just have to be crafting. My husband and I made the most delicious chocolate mousse (recipe courtesy of the Joy of Cooking, of course).

dessert

And here we are in all our mustachioed glory.

mustache

Sewing

If you follow me on Instagram (@dramaticlyric) you will have seen that I’ve been doing some sewing recently. It all started a few weeks ago when I was wandering the aisles of Barnes and Noble and a sewing book caught my eye. Now this was not just any sewing book, this was Alabama Studio Sewing + Design by Natalie Chanin. Most sewing books are about sewing woven fabrics with a machine. This book is about handsewing knitted jersey. My sewing machine is on the blink, and I actually prefer handsewing anyway, so the book caught my interest (also, I had read about Alabama Chanin on Mason Dixon Knitting). I read through it a few times, then pulled out some fabric and thread. Here’s what I’ve come up with:

A very basic but fitted dress out of grey…stuff (the fabric was given to me, so I’ve no idea what the fiber content is). I had just enough to make the dress – I even had to piece it in a few places. This dress is great on its own or as a layering piece, meaning I can wear it year-round. Perfect!

stitch

This next project is something I started in high school, but had not yet finished. A sleeveless vest with tatted lace in the back. All I needed to do was finish the arm holes.

vest

My friend has a horse, so here are some gratuitous horse pictures (also showing my recently finished Perry cardigan).

My (almost) Perfect Bathrobe

I am a lizard. Not literally, obviously, but I grew up in a very warm climate. So when it gets cold out I get very very cold. Last winter I decided I wanted the warmest, fuzziest bathrobe ever, so I started shopping around. They were all so expensive! So, frugal woman that I am, I decided to make one. How hard could it be? Knitting would take too long, so I decided to sew it. Out I went to my nearest fabric store and bought the fuzziest pretty fabric I could find. I didn’t have a pattern. But I am a smart, independent woman who doesn’t need no pattern! I measured myself. And then did some math. Measured again. Measured fabric. Did more math. Confused myself. Then repeated the whole process until I was satisfied that I was probably right.

Now came the big step: cutting! This went really well…until my cats decided that my scissors needed to be attacked! (Please, don’t worry about the kitties. They were not harmed. They were just annoying.) With my pieces cut out, I threaded my sewing machine and did most of the sewing. At which point I stopped and shoved it all in a bag to be completed later. Maybe it got warm then?

kitty

The other morning I was cold – which makes sense, since it’s fall. I remembered my partially finished bathrobe and decided the time had come to finish it. I pulled it out of the sewing box, cut out some additional pieces, and set out to finish the beast by hand (my sewing machine makes a great paper weight, but isn’t good at much else right now). So let me tell you, Chenille fabric is a lot nicer to work with than chenille yarn. The edges don’t curl or fray, so you have the option to not finish them. It makes for a pretty straightforward sewing project. Which was great, until I got to the cream fur fabric I bought for the trim. Remind me to never sew with furry fabric again. Especially by hand.

fuzzy

In the end I came up with a pretty great bathrobe. It’s very fitted, almost like a dressing gown, which I absolutely love (In fact, I’m going to call it a dressing gown. It sounds so much more classy). But the armholes are a little tight. And it doesn’t close with quite as much overlap as I had envisioned. I still have a little more finishing work to do, but all in all I am happy with my project, and I look forward to many years of warmth and comfort.

More wedding things

Because I am me and I love making things by hand…

A wedding garter in garter stitch. I love the irony. I love the simplicity. I wonder if garter stitch got its name from garters? Also, my “something blue” (it is a little brighter in real life).

And a wee wedding wristlet, just big enough to hold my phone and listick. I am very proud of this: I made it 2 layers thick so there are no edges showing on the inside, and my topstitiching is all on the outer layer (well, except for a few rogue stitches). So my inner layer is remarkably clean and makes my little crafty heart beat with joy and pride.