New Pattern: the Cobbled Hat

Pssst! Y’all, I’m sure you’ve already noticed, but Christmas is in 4 days! A lot of us are in panic knitting mode, desperately trying to get all our handmade gifts finished in time for Christmas morning. If you have a hat on your knitting list, might I suggest a pattern that I just published in Knotions Magazine?

This is the Cobbled Hat. It’s worked in worsted weight yarn on US 7 needles. Translation: this is a really quick knit. It only took me a few evenings to knit my samples. You can totally whip one (or a few) of these up in time for Christmas!

The pattern is written in 2 sizes, to fit adults and children. It’s a really stretchy stitch pattern, which makes it more likely to fit a larger variety of heads. I knit the sample to be slightly slouchy, but if you’re crunched for time you can make the body of the hat a bit shorter and it will be a fantastic beanie.

Check out the crown decreases. I am so proud of how pretty these are! The hat is shown on a lovely lady, but it looks great on men as well. The first version of this hat was for my Father-in-Law. He wears it incessantly in the colder months.

The stitch pattern is very simple and easy to memorize, but still looks like you worked hard on it. The only skills needed for this hat are casting on, knitting and purling in the round, a central double decrease, and weaving in the ends. Easy peasy, lemon squeezy!

I hope you love the Cobbled Hat as much as I do. I am immensely proud of this pattern. I can’t wait to see it worked up in stripes and gradients and all sorts of colours!

Merry knitting, friends, and Happy Christmas!

** All photos in this post are (c) Kellie Nuss for Knotions Magazine.

New Pattern! Drosseln Hat

Friends, I am so excited to tell you about my newest pattern, the Drosseln hat!

colorwork hat

This pattern was begun when the owner of my yarn store gave me a book of Medieval German embroidery patterns for my anniversary. As I flipped through the pages I was astounded at the beauty of the designs our foremothers used to portray the world around them. When I came to a page depicting two thrushes (drosseln) in a field of flowers I knew I had come upon something I wanted to knit. I used my own handspun and yarn from my honeymoon to create the first version of this design, and marked my place with Jane Austen stitch markers.

The pattern is written for a finished hat circumference of 21 inches (53.3cm) to fit head 21 inches (53.3cm) around. The patterned portion of the hat is extra thick, causing it to fit as if it has a small amount of negative ease. Sample gauge is included to make a smaller or larger hat (18 and 22 inches/45.5 and 58.5 cm).

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You can use a light fingering weight yarn held double or a light worsted weight for your CC, making this hat a great stashbuster. The colours really pop if one of your yarns is lightly variegated, or you can use solid or tonal colours for both yarns.

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From now until Christmas you can get the pattern for 25% off with the coupon code LoveMyLYS.

New Pattern Alert: The Cady Cowl

It always seems like the first half of the year drags by and the last half goes too quickly. I’m not sure why, but the sheer number of events/holidays at the end of the year may have something to do with it. I’ve been sitting on a secret for almost half a year now, and I am so excited to finally let the cat out of the bag!

cady cowl
Photo by I Like Crochet

This, my dears, is the Cady Cowl, which has just been published in the December issue of I Like Crochet Magazine. The Cady Cowl is written for just about any yarn/hook and is also written in multiple sizes. So no matter what yarn you have on hand or who you are hooking for, you’re covered.

Multiple Gauges
Pink – Bulky, Green – Worsted, Grey – Fingering

Crochet is outside my normal comfort zone, since I am primarily a knitter, and bubblegum pink is way outside my comfort zone, as my mom will tell you. But somehow I really, really love this cowl. I can’t wait to pair it with my royal blue coat to keep stylishly warm this winter.

I highly recommend taking a look through all the patterns in the December issue – if you’re especially interested, I Like Crochet is giving away yarn to make several of the patterns!

New Free Pattern: The Balai Shawl

I am excited to tell you that I’ve just published a new pattern! And this time, just to change it up a little, it’s a crochet pattern!

broomstick lace shawl

Meet the Balai shawl, published in Knotions Magazine. This shawl is worked in Broomstick lace, which I learned from my husband’s grandmother. Now I am not a super-experienced crocheter, but that just means that the pattern is simple enough that anyone can do it. All it takes is a little practice. The shawl is worked by increasing every other row, so you can make it as big as you like. And, the pattern is written to work with virtually any yarn and hook (bulky, super bulky, and jumbo weight yarns are not suggested as they may not drape well). So what are you waiting for? Grab a hook, some yarn, and a dowel (Broomstick Lace requires a dowel or stick to hold your stitches open across the row…kind of like a giant knitting needle), and get started!

broomstick lace

For more information on Broomstick Lace and a free bracelet pattern, read this post.

Pattern Testers Needed!

Hey friends! One pattern has just been published, so that means it’s time to get the next into testing. My next pattern is quite different from normal for me, in that it is a crochet pattern. It all started on my vacation last October, when my husband’s grandma taught me how to crochet broomstick lace. I got an idea at that time, and now I’ve made it a reality: I made a Broomstick Lace Shawl!

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The beauty of this shawl is that it can be made any size, and with any weight yarn, so the possibilities really are endless. Mine is a shawlette, made with a skein of Miss Babs Yowza (Worsted, 560 yds/ 512 m).

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I’m looking for 6 pattern testers – 2 each to make a shawl in fingering, Sport or DK, and Worsted weight yarns. If you’re interested, all the details are here.

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Also, I need a name for this beauty. “Broomstick Lace Shawl” is descriptive, but not very evocative. What would you name this shawl? Leave a comment and include your Ravelry name. The person who comments with the best name will receive a free copy of my Ribless Hat as thanks.

New Pattern: The Ribless Hat

Friends, I am so excited to tell you about my newest pattern, the Ribless Hat.

knitted hat with cable

This hat started when a dear friend gave me a beautiful skein of yarn. It wasn’t something I would have bought for myself, but when I really looked at it I realized how lovely it was. I knit on this hat through a move and a job change, and once it was finished it became my go-to hat. It is stylish and easy to wear and just the tiniest bit slouchy.

And (this part is key) it doesn’t have any ribbing.

knitted cables

To celebrate the release of the Ribless Hat, I am offering you a discount. Use the code HOORAY18 to receive 18% off the regular price until January 18. Easy peasy, lemon squeezy.

funny picture with knitted hat

Happy Knitting!

New Pattern Released: Angerthas Mitts

Hey friends! I am thrilled to tell you that today the pattern for my Angerthas Mitts has been released in Knotions Magazine!

grey cabled fingerless mitts

This pattern came about in an interesting way for me. Several years ago when I was a new knitter I started knitting a cabled scarf. I guessed at how to cable from instructions in books and on the internet, but I barely knew how to knit and I didn’t have a cable needle. I hated that project. I ended up putting it away for several years before turning it into a cowl just so it would be done (I talked more about it here).

Fast forward to a few months ago. I still hadn’t knit much with cables and they scared me. So what did I do to make them less scary? I designed a pattern with all sorts of cables going every which way (I’m crazy, I know). The Angerthas Mitts are what emerged from that exploration. I won’t say that I love cabling so much that cables are the only thing I will ever knit ever again, but they are less daunting now.

grey fingerless mitts

Is there a knitting technique that scares you? How have you overcome fear of the unknown (in knitting and in life)?